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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
participation. how society and in these environments as the bonds weren't as strong as they were in traditionally organized places. these are arguments for a long time. design, aesthetic and social arguments. but then a big change has been 15 years ago, the economy started talking. nobody listens to planners. which is shouting in the wind about why we feel certain things are certain ways. but i will miss them so me say say this'll make you poor and this make you richer. the.or started saying, these communities are killing us, which i begin to and finally even more recently the environmentalists figured out the city was the way to save the country and the countryside. those three issues, none of which original research on our parts form the basis for having a much more legitimate and arguable support for city life over suburban life. so what are they? the first question to ask is where do people want to be in america? in portland is a prime example. during the 90s, journal and neil population increased by 50%, which was five times the rate. educated no one else went up so much ire
for the women to be heard. it's an old boy's network and some describe it as a hostile work environment toward women, that the president does some business and bonding at his basketball games which are all male and there's a way that you could sort of set yourself up to be arm's length from the top women in the white house, to when you get to the big decision making moment, oh, i just don't know any top qualified women. >> well, i think one of the challenges he has, you have to look at him, the father of two minority women, and in the case of even my own family, my father, while he makes great, you know, tries to try to include more women he's naturally in most cases gravitates toward men, the same way i gravitate towards other women talking about challenges in my life. and that's one of the challenges that corporations and law firms are looking at heavily, how do we address this in a way that men and women are comfortable relying on each other. book to pipeline, hillary clinton did raise a daughter and did so with a lot of help around and a lot of women going into the senior roles are having
enough people. and how do we get them in an environment in which nobody wants to serve and we have a hard time making national security decisions about what to do and make them honestly and intelligently. we've had a pretty lousy record of making intelligent decisions about national security in the last few years. >> i just think it's fascinating that we're now in a position where we need to be transitioning from being a military that is making all of its decisions about dwell time and how much time you got between deployments and who is going to deploy where and when to instead thinking about a mill they're is not at war, that needs to decide what its strength is going to be, its training requirements, its weapons systems are going to be. and the last time we did this really is after vietnam and we've got all these vietnam guys. >> you're absolutely right. if you talk to a guy like marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and you get him against the corner and we're inside the cone of silence and he'll tell you honestly what he believes, he will tell you that one of the majo
and your observations on that nexus between the environment and the economy, and then i want to come to gayle, switching gears entirely, and going back to the state park concept you mentioned in your opening remark, so, frank? >> thank you, lynn. we did travel to brazil together. i've never seen a more energetic herder than lynn. [laughter] she recognizedded most of the things we saw, including some i think you have never seen before. it's important to know why we went to brazil and what that tells us about the subject we are talking about today. we went there because we wanted to find out how brazil was doing in its effort to reduce the deep forrestation that was taking place in the amazon. is the first thing we did once we got there was go to a slaughter house. we looked at each other and said, we didn't sign up for that. what's that have to do with deforestation? turns out brazil's effort to reduce deforestization was to enact a law that required certain land owners, many land owners, to take a certain part of their land, a fraction of their land and keep that in natural state, me
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
better in private. and it is as free as possible from early judgment so that you create an environment around learn in. >> my name is david sherman from the american federation of teachers. i want to say that the american federation of teachers, as was mentioned, was very involved in the development of the common core, not we as an organization, but hundreds of teachers around the country. we support it with every fiber of our being. we want to see it work. but we are very nervous. we are mainly norris -- nervous because what we are hearing from all over the country' with few exceptions is that teachers are not being prepared or given the right kind of professional development. they have a few days of the workshop. but teachers, and frankly, parents, are just not being prepared. i do have a question. since there is no teacher voice here, and going to take a moment if you do not mind. just a minute. the fact of the matter is, teachers are very supportive of the common core. teachers all across the country, but they want help to do it the right way, and they are not getting it. the feder
on some gun measures. what's clear here is the political environment in washington, we've seen over the last several months, how it's been very difficult to get movement on anything that goes down to the wire for lawmakers to come up with some sort of bipartisan agreement. what the vice president is spelling out here, is floating, essentially he's talking about the reality of the current political climate here in washington. yes, there are things that can be done legislatively. but if those things can't be done, then the president is willing to act alone. why? because he says it's time to act no now. >> i want to make it clear that we are not going to get caught up in the notion, unless we can do everything we'll do nothing. it's critically important that we act. >> in addition to these meetings that you spelled out earlier that the vice president is holding today, yesterday he also met with some faith leaders. they talked about the moral imperative to act quickly. he also had a conference call with governors, other stated and local officials across the country. they're really tryin
, first the committee on the environment and pickup works. and then, more importantly the committee on finance. you know, i could maybe tell the governor some more stories about how i pushed through the biggest tax increase in history 20 years ago, maybe entertain him with some of the funny stuff that happened on the senate floor when the republicans were not half as crazy as they are now. and then beg the governor to appoint me as john kerry's successor in the senate. my point, basically, experience matters. and in the overnight polling, america spoke, spoke clearly in favor of a senator o'donnell. in a poll we conducted on our website i now have a huge lead. a huge lead over anyone else to be appointed senator from massachusetts. 40% want barney frank. only 4% want oscar winner and current oscar contender ben affleck to take time off from living the dream to cast some votes in the senate for a couple of months. and as i stared at the polling today, 51% supported me. as i stared at those results, refreshing the refresh button, as the hundreds of votes were cast i reached for the ph
our national security needs are, and make cuts in the environment and housing and transportation, and i just believe that i'm better prepared having just done what i have done to do this. it's not that i'd be the best interim senator ever. just that in these particular circumstances with very complex issues as kind of a continuat n continuation, i'm there and i believe it's very important for us to go after them, for example, on this phony, irresponsible issue on the debt limit and do defense, social security, and medicare. the two most successful anti-poverty programs in history. a at a time when people say we have too much inequality, the notion you would increase equality is nuts, and further -- look, i had some unhappiness when i read about chuck hagel's remarks from 14 years eg which i didn't remember, but now the question is he's a man who is going to help us withdraw from afghanistan and reduce the military. i'm very encouraged by that. my one criticism of the president was he wasn't going far enough in reducing the military. i think people now understand that it's either
are actually behind the counter in dispensaries, and so it's a very safe, secure, highly regulated environment that we operate in. >> okay. so 18 states have now passed medical marijuana laws. 18 states, so you -- you operate -- you operate already in california. you operate in canada. you've got dispensers coming to market in arizona in a matter of weeks. >> correct. >> what when are you likely to break into the remaining states? what's the plan for growth? >> that's a very good question because we are not just about medical marijuana. our technology crosses many boundaries in the traditional pharmacy retailing business, whether it's retail pharmacies, institutional pharmacy plays, doctor offices, hospice, long-term care, so our solution really is very broad scope and has a tremendous value proposition in traditional pharmacy and in traditional health care. in terms of medical marijuana we are on a state-by-state awareness, put if in aware ney. every state sen acting its own laws and regulations so we're currently enacting the rules in recently passed state like connecticut and massachusetts.
on wall street to be concerned. but we're not really in a political environment, brooke, where the -- neither the white house nor most people are concerned with whether or not wall street likes the pick. but he is -- he's a guy who had experience. he was involved in the 1997 balanced budget deal. he's been involved in social security legislation. all the topics that are hot right now, jack lew does have experience with. >> you mentioned sequestration, of course. we have a couple of fiscal cliffs over the next two months. do we have any idea what kind of negotiator he'll be and he'll drive a tough bargain with the speaker of the house, john boehner. >> as the chief of staff of the white house, that's a key issue. you got to be able to be tough, you got to be able to negotiate. if you were grading the white house and its negotiating abilities in the last few months, you may not give them a very high grade. what you get in jack lew is a guy who is highly, specifically familiar with the budgeting process. i wouldn't normally say this, that that's the most important thing a treasury
that [ bleep ]. did you take what she said seriously? >> it felt like an unsafe work environment. any time anybody is reeling threats at somebody, you know, that's not appropriate sitting there on the road with two babies. i'm not going to take any chances. so yeah, i did hire more security. >> reporter: nicky has denied saying anything about a gun, calling it a fabrication. when we asked her for a comment, her representative told us, she's said what she is saying about this topic. >> i'm doing this show, it's fun but it's not my life. >> reporter: indeed, these days her life is about being mom to her well-dressed 20-month-old twins. the girl, named monroe. >> i call her miss monroe. that kind of dictated her personality. she's a total diva. she's fascinated by jewelry, chandeliers. >> reporter: and a little boy named moroccan. >> we call him rock. he's my pal. he'll just watch movies with me. we have fun. it's just fun. >> reporter: for now, mariah is trying to stay close to home to spend quality time with the twins. and she says she and nicky have made up. we will get to see if that's tr
as to believe that we ever could have done anything close to a 10. given the domestic political environment, international situation, we are in, the weakness of our economy there is nothing of the seven or eight in the cards. it is worth looking at a 10 to realize why we are not in the best of all possible worlds. issue one is the big enchilada, in dealing with the long-term fiscal balance that we face in 8 sensible way. i would have given a 10 to what folks were talking about the new was unachievable, the grants bargain be -- the grand bargain taxes that would have stabilized the debt to gdp ratio. that would have been a package somewhere in the 2-$3 trillion range. the tiny between the election in the first to work out all those details. irrespective of that, we have two political party snarling at each other and not a whole lot in the way of negotiations. that was not in the cards. nine would have come from enacting some big pieces accompanied by a framework that would specify how the rest of the puzzle would be put together over the next six months. some incredible enforcement mechanism
influenced environment speaking to members of their own discipline-based tribe and try to help them translate their work to a larger audience and that sometimes can be a real challenge. but it goes to the heart of what oxford should be doing which is not publishing works to very small groups of intellectuals, although that is a crucial part of what we do, but also trying to identify works that are broader input and trying to bring those works to people who are interested who did do not reside in the academy. so i think the subtitle of the session today is the publishing world today and tomorrow and i want to look back a little bit and tell you the differences that i have tracked in the last 25 years of my time in publishing through the prism of how people have responded say at a cocktail party when i tell them i'm in publishing. it used to be that there were essentially two. the first response was to ask me whether i've read anything that was published which is obviously completely impossible and the other was to tell me about the book ideas. and that of course is exactly as it should be. tha
that game in that environment? hundreds of fans supporting their red and gold celebrated their big win. and you want to see 49er fever check that out. that's the embarcadero. the towers of the embarcadero. officials plan to shine the lights every night this week and hopefully through next weekend's nfc championship and right on through the super bowl on february 3rd. >>> we will move on to other stories. we'll talk about this shooting a little bit later on in the newscast. we want to talk about the show. that is right after our show in just about 30 minutes. then at 10:00 you can watch the sea hawks and falcons. and of course at 1:00 you have the ot. >>> new this morning a benefit concert for injured san francisco giants fan bryan stow is set to hit northern california tv screens. the concert schedule includes specials by giants third baseman. it's being televised on the com cast hometown network at 8:00 p.m.. donations will be accepted throughout the broadcast. he was attacked and severely injured at dodger stadium back in 2011. >>> two men and one woman are the latest victims. they w
hills was the hud secretary in 1975. so it's been a long journey, and i think given today's environment, given that, again, 42% of our population is diverse, we should have a cabinet that looks like america. >> so every administration doesn't have enough diversity in it. >> i'm kind of quite surprised at that because with this president with his particular history and given all the campaign rhetoric about diversity and the female voter. >> let me bring up what the president's spokesperson said, jay carney. he said the president is choosing the best candidate available for the job. >> i'm shocked at that statement. you know, that's kind of a statement that was an excuse that was commonly used 20, 25 years ago. we're not talking about special treatment. we're talking about going out and finding the most qualified people where over 50% of the population are women, and we have tens of millions of americans who are people of color. >> so your message to the president is? >> i think he can do better. with every administration. regardless of which administration it is. we hope that we have a m
car, try to save gas and help the environment and they'll still tax you. you really can't make this stuff up. we'll deal with it next and look at this quote. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphy
street environment it focused on more short-term results. more than a year after his death, steve johnsbs was still at the top. at number two, amazon's jeff bezos, share holders of the online retailer have seen a return of more than 12,000% since 1996. in third place, the leader of samsung. he's turned the maker of large screen tvs and cell phones into a dominant worldwide player in consumer electronics. including in the top 100, notables like current hewlett-packard's ceo meg whitman. the owner of the nba's nets and former google ceo eric schmidt. and the biggest leap for a ceo from harvard's last ranking in 2010 was made by lars sorensen who leads the pharmaceutical manufacturer. he jumped all the way from number 233 to number 20. >> and joining us now is susan battery, an expert on leadership and career experts. she's a ceo herr of battley consultants. good morning. >> do you think they got it right? i think they got it right on one aspect which is shareholder value over time. while this is critical in terms of what investors are looking at, i do believe
.com last month and here is the representative cynthia chase collins, what we can do is make the environment here so welcoming, some may not come and some may leave. one way to pass measures that restrict freedom that they think they will find her. another is it to shine the bright light of publicity on who they are and why they are coming. and lay it on the specifics though? >> as a matter of fact there hasn't been much since this. she served two terms in the house in new hampshire, and this is a relatively obscure legislator who got off to a very progressive, left wing blog and made these comments. look, one of the things to realize is the state of new hampshire has 400 members of the house and they see it's the largest deliberative body and free tolls mileage to the state capital. it's truly a citizen's legislature. for the most part most of the representatives serve the people of the granite state very well. every once in a while, you get what you pay for. in this case, i think maybe the voters of new hampshire wan to take perhaps another look at representative chase's intolerance, which
environment. the food is brought to them. so they actually harm the stability of the dog. dogs love to work for what he has. that's why i suggest exercised discipline, that affects your body, mind and heart. >> this is all your philosophy. it's building on your -- it's less about a formula, but more than philosophy -- >> the excuse, i believe. >> 43 years of knowledge that i -- people want to know. what do i do with a barking dog. here it is. page whatever it is. people want solutions. people want it quick. >> i hope thunder is not listening here. the issue of stupid dogs. what about dogs who eat clothing? hypothetically. >> hypothetically. who like eat, say, my daughter's under wear. perverted -- >> they don't have a proper outlet. they do behaviors that appear stupid to people. >> is it because he's a apartment dog? >> it's because he doesn't have the proper challenge, like sheep herding dogs live in the city, they have a tendency to go after bikes and kids and things. they don't have the proper outlet. >> what's the proper outlet for dogs that eat stupid things. >> i need to follow this.
with a cascading flood of cuts. and for that kind of an environment, you don't need somebody who is an outsider who doesn't have the practical experience and who's nakedly ambitious for the job. >> tom cotton is a republican congressman, veteran of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. thank you for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. good to be here with you. >> why do you oppose the nomination of chuck hagel to be defense secretary? >> wolf, the president said that chuck hagel is the leader our troops deserve. i couldn't disagree any more strongly. our troops deserve much better than a man who voted to send them to war when it was popular and then abandon those very troops when it was unpopular. i would know, wolf. i was one of those troops. i returned from iraq in november 2006 with my platoon from the 101st airborne just as chuck hagel was writing that we couldn't achieve victory in iraq, that time for more troops had passed and it was time to withdraw. he just didn't oppose the surge, wolf. he called it the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country's history since vietnam. he delayed emerge
a wonderful environment. a friend and i kind of had a romantic idea about starting a used bookstore. we both had english degrees and used to go around to different bookstores and thought it would be neat to open one. and we did and quickly found that we didn't know anything about business or the book business. and he dropped out and pursued other quests, and i kind of stuck with it. at that time there was a magazine called the antiquarian bookmen's weekly, and people -- the first 25 or 30 pages were articles about the book trade, and the rest of the magazine were lists of books for sale, and in the back of the magazine books that people wanted. so that was pretty much how i learned about the book business, going through that magazine every week and quoting books to other dealers and reading the articles. we started in '81 in the basement of a building up the street and, hence, that was the name, cellar stories, because we began in the basement of -- while we have a little bit of everything, we also have in-depth collections of rhode island history, we have a lot of math books, we have art an
president obama. host: the director at their center for energy and environment. and if you want to find out more about what goes on at the cei you can go to their website. we're going back to the phones and talk to gary on our line for republicans. caller: good morning. my experience with co2 is like in 1957, on the southeastern ash reel forest right there after you come out of florida. it's off to your left first after you go past the first exit to valdosta georgia. the moss was 2 feet high on the trunks. 50 years later, it was 110, 115 feet high. that's what moss, mold, middleu, pond scum. they like a little more co2. so does poison ivy, mosquitos, ticks. plants do grow better but like grapes they produce less sugar when they have higher co2. you have more yellow leaves. and i think one of the solutions would be for everybody to grow their grass longer because it would consume more co2 and produce more oxygen. you would have better water retention. aquifer regeneration, water purifyication, more lightning bugs that hate moss and slugs. host: we're going to leave it there. is that the solu
something like libya, chaos, bad acting, all things of -- all kinds of things can happen in that environment. host: early in this conflict, you and others wrote about the family dynamics in the the assad family. his mother is still alive, and by many accounts, calling the shots behind the scenes. can you elaborate? guest: i have not heard that. it is a family affair. his father ruled syria for many years pdt killed 30,000 syrians in putting in -- for many years. he killed 30,000 syrians. the security forces have held tight around him. his mother calling the shots -- i'm not aware of that. host: one of our viewers saying i would prefer the position of switzerland. no one seems interested in blowing up their cities. a position that continues to percolate -- a position that continues to percolate in this country. est: people who read -- our leaders read it such. they go into a full retrenchment, retreat view. world is a very chaotic place right now. you have a people associated with the arab spring. you have the euro crisis. you have a global recession. you have a rising china. it is a very a
beads on a minisubs and body washes they could be bad for the environment. the problem is those tiny beads don't descend a great and end up going down the drain and can end up in the ocean where they can be swallowed by marine life. now you know lever the company that makes them selves, gasoline and other popular skin-care products once remove my grubbies from its products by 2015. unilever says it's looking for an alternative to the mall plastic might grow beets.my grow beads. droid dna augmentation initiated. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. >> looking at a hot spot mt. view a disabled big rig on 1 01 in the northbound direction has been blocking one of the right-hand lanes and taking a long time to clear. it is now starting to have ripple effects. affected arrive on 1 01 northbound and traffic was little lighter than it normally would have been which is why we don't have a bigger
. do it again. do it again. do it again. >> i'm focused with professionals in a controlled environment. to my surprise, lou describes this as a the pussy cat of weapons. >> what'd you think about shooting that? >> reporter: i have to agree with lou, it's a very gentle gun. >> it is. >> reporter: my city has lots of police and lots of gun laws. as a civilian, i can't carry a firearm here. lou, a former cop, can, and never leaves home without one. his concern -- >> they're legislating laws that do not impact the criminal element. in other words, the only people that obey the law are law-abiding citizens. >> reporter: the aurora movie theater shooter used three firearms, one a shotgun similar to this. a single cartridge, multiple pellets, maximum damage. >> you can smell the powder, too. >> absolutely. >> reporter: i'm torn between fascination and fear. i understand self-protection and competitive sport but gun crime is a reality in my city. >> i look at people as being evil, you know? i've never seen a gun jump up on its own and shoot someone. >> reporter: so i change my scenario. if i l
policy, for example. they've done so many things by executive order on the environment that are radical shifts from where most americans are. i don't see why anyone would dismiss that the kind of extreme measures that people have contemplated in the past and what's most dangerous is the way that they couch their rhetoric in what seems to be moderation. right now they're talking about gun safety instead of gun control. and when they harp about assault weapons or ammunition, what they're really talking about, and we have had this kind of cantor before from the gun grabbers is talking about the kind of hand guns that ordinary americans use to protect themselves. >> steve: sure. exactly. you know, what they're looking at right now, background checks and things like that, and the fact that they want to have no gun zones around schools, neither one of those would have probably stopped the tragedy in sandy hook because the guns did not belong to the shooter. it was already a no gun zone at that school. we've got a sound bite for everybody to listen to. here is bill clinton in las vegas at the
would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we live in today. i think something else is important here and certai
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)